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25th anniversary of Expo '92

 
On 20 April the 15th Anniversary of Seville's Expo began with acts commemorating the event. In Seville, the Expo was a technological and cultural revolution in the year 1992. This was the Expo's promotional video.
 
You could find the latest technological advances and meet people of all nationalities and cultures, some of which we didn't even know existed until then.
 
 
  
 
 
Today with technology it is extremely interesting to access this information but in 1992 it was a revolution seeing a colour photocopy and taking it home with you, visiting a 3D cinema or discovering exotic cultures such as the Maoris and their dances.
 
 
  
 
Maori in New Zealand Pavilion;
 
Here at Hotel Murillo we also wished to commemorate the Expo 92 by encouraging you to visit some of the activities scheduled for the 25th anniversary or the pavilions that are still open at the fair ground and that you can visit as a part of the celebration.
 
We recommend you begin with the central act of this anniversary celebration, the permanent exhibition that will be open until 12 October in the Sailing Pavilion.
 
 
  
 
 
Divided into two, you can first learn about the changes Seville and Andalusia underwent in terms of infrastructure due to the Expo. Secondly, you will find out about the Expo's six months through images, melodies and videos that will take you back in time. Price €3.
 
From there, we recommend you go for a walk and explore Monasterio de la Cartuja, which become the Expo's symbolic building where all the big names stopped at.
 
 
  
 
 
To finish, walk through the different pavilions that still bear a resemblance to their appearance at the Expo 92:
 
Morocco Pavilion, Calle Charles Darwin
 
 
  
 
Photography by Fernando Ruso. 
 
One of the permanent pavilions. Situated on Camino de los Descubrimientos, it was a personal undertaking of King Hassan II. Its cost reached $6 million and to complete it 600 handcraft workers were required. When the Expo was finished, it was gifted to the State, which granted it for the creation of the Three Cultures of the Mediterranean Foundation. Today it is one of the best preserved and used pavilions.
 
Italy Pavilion, Calle Isaac Newton
 
  
 
Photography by Fernando Ruso. 
 
This country pavilion is the pavilion with the largest constructed surface after Spain's, and one of those that has best survived the passing of time. It had a circular cinema that imitated a terrestrial globe and that had the ability to ignite the senses. It also had a satellite that travelled from one end of the pavilion to the other. In the pavilion's hall you can find a miniature of the Island of Cartuja. The model is updated periodically and it shows Torre Sevilla, Alamillo Park and La Cartuja Stadium.
 
It now includes leading technology companies such as AT4 Wireless and Telecom-Ibérica.
 
Hungary Pavilion, Calle Marie Curie, 5.
 
  
 
 
One of the Expo's gems. Designed by the prestigious architect, Imre Makovecz, it sits on a plot of 1,639 square metres. At the entrance to the pavilion there is a mask that invokes the enmity felt towards the Christians (Santa Sede Pavilion was situated opposite). The space comprises seven towers that symbolise the country's seven religions.
 
Finland Pavilion, Calle Marie Curie, 3
 
  
 
 
Situated next to the Hungary Pavilion, this is home to the headquarters of Fidas (Foundation for Innovation and Diffusion of Architecture). It recreates Hell's Gorge, which is a geographical accident in Finland. It comprises two parts: one is constructed from wood and represents the country's traditional aspect; the other is made from metal and symbolises industrial progress in harmony with nature.
 
A tree of life - a dried willow tree - brought directly from Finland with roots that can be seen through a glass floor, still remains.
 
France Pavilion, Camino de los Descubrimientos Edificio El Cubo.
 
  
 
 
France tried to symbolise the power and cutting edge of its country at Seville's Expo through a deep cube that created a kaleidoscopic effect on the building: "a glass sky measuring 15 metres, held up by four slim carbon fiber columns. This sky covers a pedestal, under which, 20 metres below, is the pavilion itself." Today it is a breeding ground for companies controlled by the Fundación Telefónica.
 
Mexico Pavilion, Calle Tomás Alba Edison, 6.
 
  
 
 
this pavilion has a hundred-year-old cactus that was brought over from Mexicali, the capital of the state of Baja California, as a gift from Mexico to Spain. The pavilion has changed greatly. Before, it had a metal structure with sacks of earth where flowers were planted, from which a bridge emerged signifying the union between Spain and America. Next to Mexico you will find the pavilions of South Korea and Puerto Rico.
 
New Zealand Pavilion, Calle Leonardo da Vinci, 21
 
  
 
 
This is another famous pavilion. It was built to recreate what Captain Cook found when he reached the coast of New Zealand and it has a stage with skylights that provide the interior space with light.
 
We hope you enjoy the tour we have devised to discover and explore what Expo 92 left us.
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